Sit Silently and Wait

Sometimes what happens is that meditation is close by but you are engaged in other things. That still small voice is within you but you are full of noise, engagements, occupations, responsibilities. And meditation comes like a whisper, it doesn’t come like a slogan shouting, it comes very silently. It makes no noise. Not even the footsteps are heard. So if you are engaged, it waits and goes.

Therefore, make it a point, at least an hour every day, just to sit silently and wait for it. Don’t do anything; just sit silently with closed eyes in great waiting, with a waiting heart, with an open heart. You are there, just waiting, so if something happens then you are ready to receive it. If nothing happens don’t feel frustrated. Even sitting for one hour and having nothing happen is good; it’s relaxing. It calms you down, makes you still, makes you more centered and rooted. But more and more it will come and slowly, oh so slowly, there will arise an understanding between you and the meditative state; that you wait at a certain hour in a certain room at a certain time, it will come more and more. It is not something that comes from the outside; it comes from your innermost core. But when the inner conscious knows that the outer conscious is waiting for it, there is more possibility of meeting.

Just sit under a tree. The breeze is blowing and the leaves of the tree are rustling. The wind touches you, it moves around you, it passes. But don’t allow it just to pass you; allow it to move within you and pass through you. Just close your eyes, and as it is passing through the tree and there is a rustling of leaves, feel that you are also like a tree, open, and the wind is blowing through you – not by your side, but right through you.

OSHO

Kundalini Meditation – Sun Drops, Moon Drops

In Hinduism, the water of life or nectar of immortality is called “amrita” (“immortal”). It is frequently employed in the Vedas (cf. “soma”), but is also part of Śivaite Tantra, where it is coupled with “rakta” (“blood”) and its associated sacrificial practices.

In the Sâdhana of Amitâyus (the Buddha of Boundless Life, a manifestation of Amitâbha, the Buddha of Boundless Light), the long-life vase containing the nectar of immortality (“amrita”) appears. It is employed in longevity rituals, aimed to increase the lifespan of practitioners with the intention to benefit sentient beings longer.

In the iconography of Padmasambhava, the long-life vase returns, but rests in the skull-cup (“kapila”), representing the polarity symbols of white & red “drops” essential in all Highest Yoga Tantras.

In Tantras of the Father (method) class, method is represented by the white drops situated in the crown wheel, and wisdom by the red drops in the navel wheel. The Lunar white drop (from the father) is linked with “amrita” and the “method” of the long-life vase, whereas the Solar red drop (from the mother) is “rakta” (“blood”) and the “wisdom” of the skull-cup (in Mother tantras, stressing wisdom, these polarities may be reversed). The white drops sustain the solid white organs of bone, brain, marrow & spinal cord, whereas the red drops gives rise to the soft red organs of viscera, blood & muscle tissue. These equivalences are not direct, but indirect by way of hylic-pluralistic multicorporality, in particular the subtle anatomy of the “Vajra body” with its “wheels” (“ćakra”), “channels” (“nadî”) & “winds” (“prâna” or “ch’i”).

http://bodhi.sofiatopia.org/nectar.htm

 

What is Buddhism? Who is the Founder of Buddhism?

Buddhism is a religion and philosophy with a wide variety of traditions, beliefs and practices which are largely based on the teachings of Siddhartha Gautama, commonly known as the Buddha (Pali / Sanskrit “The Awakening”).

Two main branches of Buddhism are recognized: Theravada (“The School of the Elders”) and Mahayana (“Greater”) vehicle.

Theravada, the older branch, has a widespread following in Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia. Mahayana has a large following across east Asia and encompasses the traditions of the Pure Land, Zen, Nichiren Buddhism, Tibetan Buddhism, Shingon, Tendai and Shinnyo-en. While Buddhism is the most popular in Asia, the two branches have now spread across the entire world.

The basic practices of Buddhism are geared toward meditation. But Zen Buddhist practices extend beyond.

Rinzai and Soto are two of the seven great Zen Buddhists in Japan with Soto being the most common one of the two. In fact, the word “Zen”, comes from the Sanskrit word for meditation. All can be transformed into “zazen” which is the name of a Zen Buddhist meditation technique. Regular daily practice is of paramount importance.

Buddhists from Monaco spend a lot of time meditating. Meditation on the koan is mainly used by the branch of the Rinzai Zen. All practitioners of Zen Buddhism seek enlightenment. Although meditation is the most important part of the practice, the addition of other techniques can help achieve this goal.

Buddhism is a religion based on the teachings of the Buddha, known as “Dharma”. Those who practice Buddhism are in a spiritual search to achieve a state of complete enlightenment known as nirvana.

This religion focused on the teachings of the Buddha, by supporting the Sangha (the trailer) to meditation as a means to train the mind to eliminate suffering and to attain nirvana.

Theravada Buddhism was the Tripitaka, the Pali canon of Buddhist teachings, and Ten Commandments that govern the lives of Buddhist monks.

Practiced mainly in China, Korea and Japan, Mahayana Buddhism includes elements of mysticism and cosmology. Mahayana Buddhism is fragmented into two variants. Zen Buddhism, which focuses more on the internalization of the spiritual journey and self-confidence and the Pure Land, which teaches the devotion to the Buddha Amitabha is needed to reach nirvana.

Although strongly influenced by Mahayana Buddhism, Tibetan Buddhism or Vajrayana constitutes another significant discipline of the Buddhist faith. Also Tantric Buddhism known Vajrayana contains both text and writing including Theraveda Mahayana Buddhism and Buddhist tantra.

Read more about buddhist wisdom at wisdomchange.com:http://blog.wisdomchange.com/buddhist_wisdom.php

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Different Types of Buddhism

Just like there are many different denominations of Christianity – including Protestant churches and Catholicism, the different types of Buddhism reflect the way that this religion is practiced.

Buddhism is a dharmic religion and form of spirituality that revolves around certain beliefs and practices – all of which are aimed at bringing the participant closer to Buddhahood – the highest level of spiritual awareness. However, because the religion has gained followers in several different parts of the world (mostly in Asia), the way that Buddhism is practiced has split into several different sects. All of the Buddhist sects believe certain things in common: all accept Buddha as their teacher, use the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path in their teachings, and believe that Buddhahood is the highest attainment.

Most scholars divide the different types of Buddhism into three sections. The first of these is Southern Buddhism, or Theraveda Buddhism. The word Theraveda is a word in the Pali language (thought to be spoken by the Buddha) that means “the Doctrine of the Elders”. The biggest aim in the Theraveda practice is to use meditation to train the mind, and to encourage freedom of the mind from suffering. This freedom from suffering will allow you to reach the greatest spiritual goal – Nirvana. Theraveda Buddhism is the only surviving school from the earliest years of Buddhism, and it is mostly practiced today in Sri Lanka, Laos and Cambodia.

The second type of Buddhism that is mentioned is Eastern Buddhism, also known as Mahayana Buddhism. This sect not only teaches the Pali Canon (which is the religious text of Theraveda Buddhism) but also includes additional texts and beliefs. In order to reach Nirvana, Mahayana Buddhists believe that a person must practice universal compassion, which is the altruistic quest of the Bodhisattva to attain the “Awakened Mind” of Buddhahood. Mahayana Buddhism also has a level of mysticism involved. This type of Buddhism is practiced in China, Korea and Japan, as well as parts of other Asian countries.

The third of the different types of Buddhism is Northern or Tibetan Buddhism. Tibetan Buddhism is also considered to be a type of Mahayana Buddhism, but it also embraces other teachings, texts and practices that are not seen in the Eastern type of Mahayana Buddhism. Tibetan Buddhism is also sometimes called Tantric Buddhism or Vajrayana. This type of Buddhism uses both the Mahayana and Theraveda scriptures, as well as a number of Buddhist Tantras – all of which are aimed at attaining Buddhahood in just one lifetime instead of requiring many reincarnations.

While all of the different types of Buddhism have the same goal and same basis for their beliefs, the way that Buddhahood is obtained varies from sect to sect. It is important to understand the way that each sect works before choosing to practice a type of Buddhism.

Read free dahli lama quotes daily for peace and enlightenment at DahliLamaQuotesDaily.com

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reblogged from: http://knowmoreabout.net/

Mind in Indian Buddhist Philosophy

Perhaps no other classical philosophical tradition, East or West, offers a more complex and counter-intuitive account of mind and mental phenomena than Buddhism. While Buddhists share with other Indian philosophers the view that the domain of the mental encompasses a set of interrelated faculties and processes, they do not associate mental phenomena with the activity of a substantial, independent, and enduring self or agent. Rather, Buddhist theories of mind center on the doctrine of no-self (Pāli anatta, Skt.[1] anātma), which postulates that human beings are reducible to the physical and psychological constituents and processes which comprise them.

Indian Buddhist analyses of the mind span a period of some fifteen centuries, from the earliest discourses of the Buddha (ca. 450 B.C.E.) to the systematic developments of late Mahāyāna Buddhism (500–1000 C.E.). Although philosophical accounts of mind emerge only within the Abhidharma scholastic traditions (roughly 150 B.C.E. to 450 C.E.), their roots are found in the Buddha’s teachings of the no-self doctrine. At the same time, these accounts parallel similar theoretical developments within the Brahmanical traditions, with which they share a common philosophical vocabulary (and a general view of mental processes as hierarchical and discrete). This article focuses on the picture of mind and mental phenomena that emerges from the canonical literature, the theories of mind advanced by the main Abhidharma scholastic traditions, and the epistemological issues of perception and intentionality debated by philosophers such as Vasubandhu, Dignāga, Dharmakīrti, Candrakīrti, Śāntarakṣita, and Dharmottara.

All references to the canonical literature are to the major collections of texts in the Pāli Canon, primarily to the LongMiddle, and Connected Discourses of the Buddha (the Dīgha,Majjhima, and Saṃyutta Nikāyas respectively). For the Abhidharmic account of mind and related phenomena I draw almost exclusively from Vasubandhu’s Treasury of Higher Knowledge (Abhidharmakośa and its bhāṣya; hereafter AKBh), a foundational text for most of the philosophical developments of late Indian Buddhism.

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Coseru, Christian, “Mind in Indian Buddhist Philosophy”, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2011 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2011/entries/mind-indian-buddhism/&gt;.

Introduction To Tantric Buddhism

On the fringes of Indian civilization, in the unsettled areas, in the edges of the forest, and in the frightening and impure spaces in the cremation grounds on the edge of major cities, a new vision of Buddhist practice began to emerge. This vision eventually came to be known as Tantra.

The Tantric version of Buddhism brought about a profound change in Buddhist values. Tantric Buddhism began to emerge in India during the 6th century A.D. I use the word emerge because we don’t really know when it began. There are stories that trace back the tradition to the time of the Buddha, but it only emerged as a fully cultural phenomenon many centuries after the lifetime of the Buddha.

Tantra is really a pan-Indian phenomenon. It’s not just found in Buddhism, but also in Hinduism, and in other Indian religious traditions as Jainism. You can also find Islamic Tantra. It is a religious tradition that is found across the whole sweep of the Indian religious landscape.

Tantric Buddhism shares a lot of important concepts, symbols and ritual practices with its tantric counterparts in other Indian traditions. As was true with earlier movements like the Mahayana, Tantric Buddhism produced an extraordinary transformation in Buddhist values. The first question we might ask is wether this means that Tantra is in some sense a whole new form of Buddhism.

Sometimes, people treat the Tantric tradition as a separate vehicle, alongside the Theravada and the Mahayana. I think that it is more accurate and helpful for us to think of Tantra as an extension of the values of the Mahayana. In the next series of articles we are going to study Tantra and its fundamental teachings:

    • The Meaning of Tantra: The best way for us to start studying Tantra is to look at some of the names that people use to refer to the Tantric tradition. What does the word Tantra mean? It turns out that this is pretty mysterious. It has several meanings and it is hard for us to know exactly which one is the one that most directly applies to the Tantric tradition.
    • The Fundamental Teaching Of Tantric Buddhism: What is the fundamental teaching of the Tantras? Think of Tantra as simply a radical extension of the idea of non-duality. It is about overcoming duality. How does the Tantra do this? In a way that for us is quite striking.
    • The Practice of Tantra: A common question about Tantra is whether there is anything that distinguishes the practitioners of Tantra from the ordinary practitioners of other traditions. Who are these people? Who practice Tantra in this form?
  • The Buddhist Mandala: The Mandala is a system of Tantric symbolism that is based not in the number two, but in the number five. The word Mandala means simply “circle”. In its most simple form, a Mandala consists of five major points: North, South, East, West and the point of the center.It is useful to think of the Mandala as functioning in a simple ritual way. It simply draws a line around some ritual space, demarcates it and separates it from the profane space that lies outside.

Reblogged from: http://buddhism-eyes.blogspot.com/2008/11/introduction-to-tantric-buddhism.html

Tantra definition


Tantra:
 (Sanskrit) Literally, “a continuum or unbroken stream [of energy].”

In spite of the opinions (and financial interests) of many Westerners, the term Tantra is not immediately synonymous with sex. The vast majority of traditions of Tantra have degenerated completely and are dangerous. One should study extensively before taking on any teachings or practice of Tantra.

Tantra Yoga had been one of the potent powers for the spiritual regeneration of the Hindus. When practiced by the ignorant, unenlightened, and unqualified persons, it has led to certain abuses; and there is no denying that some degraded forms of Saktism have sought nothing but magic, immorality, and occult powers. – Swami Sivananda

Genuine tantra is an exceptional method of purifying the consciousness of all egotistical elements: lust, pride, envy, gluttony, laziness, etc., but it is not easy or overnight, and requires great temperance, intelligence, education, and dedication.

[Buddha] Shakyamuni did not teach that people with loose ethics will succeed in Tantra. That is not the way leading to the city of nirvana. How could these evil churls succeed in Tantra? How could people with loose ethics go to the upper realms? They will not go to a high rebirth; they will not have supreme happiness. – The Manjushri Root Tantra

Success in Tantra is determined by the ethical discipline that leads up to it.

The term Tantra refers first (1) to the continuum of vital energy that sustains all existence, and second (2) to the class of knowledge and practices that harnesses that vital energy, thereby transforming the practitioner.

Tantra is primarily known in two forms:

Each have their own scriptures, schools, traditions, and practices, which vary widely.

There are many varieties of Tantra, but they can be classified in three types: White, Grey and Black. These are differentiated by examination of the results they produce.

  • White Tantra: those schools that produce beings who are clean of all egotistical desire, anger, lust, envy, etc. Such beings are known as Buddhas, Masters, Angels, Devas, etc.
  • Grey Tantra: those schools who want to be White but do not renounce Black methods. They are caught in the middle.
  • Black Tantra: those schools that produce beings who sustain and develop the causes of suffering, namely lust, anger, greed, pride, etc. Such beings are called demons, sorcerers, Maruts, Asuras, etc.

Learn more about these types of schools here: Forms of Tantra.

This blog is solely concerned with the scriptures and techniques belonging to White forms of Tantra.

Tantra has long been known in the West as Alchemy, and has also been present in the esoteric heart of every great religion. Study of this site will demonstrate that fact.

Quotes about Tantra

“The Tantric student must be endowed with purity, faith, devotion, dedication to Guru, dispassion, humility, courage, cosmic love, truthfulness, non-covetousness, and contentment.” – Swami Sivananda

“The passions which bind may be so employed as to act as forces whereby the particular life of which they are the strongest manifestation is raised to the universal life. Passion, which has hitherto run downwards and outwards to waste, is directed inwards and upwards, and transformed to power.” – Mahanirvana Tantra

“In general, all systems of highest yoga tantra‘s completion stage involve the preliminary process of controlling the vital energies…” – Tsongkhapa, founder of the Gelugpa school of Tibetan Buddhism

“In the view of Tantra, the body’s vital energies are the vehicles of the mind. When the vital energies are pure and subtle, one’s state of mind will be accordingly affected. By transforming these bodily energies we transform the state of consciousness.” – The 14th Dalai Lama