Seven Sacred Teachings

The traditional ideals of respect and sharing that form the base of the Aboriginal way of life are built around the seven sacred teachings.
Each law is taught by an animal to teach the lessons that all actions and decisions made by us are done on a physical plane. The animals have taught us how to live close to the earth, and the connection that has been established between the animals and us hasinstilled a respect for all life in those who follow the traditional Aboriginal way.

Wisdom ~ Beaver
The building of a community is entirely dependent on gifts given to each member by the creator and how these gifts are used. The Beaver’s example of using his sharp teeth for cutting trees and branches to build his dams and lodges expresses this teaching. If he did not use his teeth, the teeth would continue to grow until they became useless, ultimately making it impossible for him to sustain himself. The same can be said for human beings. One’s spirit will grow weak if it is not fulfilling its use. When used properly however, these gifts contribute to the development of a peaceful and healthy community.

Love ~ Eagle
To feel true love is to know the Creator. Therefore, it is expected that one’s first love is to be the Great Spirit. He is considered the father of all children, and the giver of human life. Love given to the Great Spirit is expressed through love of oneself, and it is understood that if one cannot love oneself, it is impossible to love anyone else.
The Eagle was chosen by the Great Spirit to represent this law, as the Eagle can reach the highest out of all the creatures in bringing pure vision to the seeker. Though the purveyor of the greatest and most powerful medicine, love can also be the most elusive of the teachings, as it depends upon a world that acknowledges the importance of spirituality.

Respect ~ Buffalo
The Buffalo, through giving it’s life and sharing every part of it’s being, showed the deep respect it had for the people. No animal was more important to the existence of Indigenous families than this animal, and it’s gift provided shelter, clothing and utensils for daily living. Native people believed themselves to be true caretakers of the great herds, and developed a sustainable relationship with the Buffalo resulting in a relationship that was a true expression of respect.

Courage/Bravery ~ Bear
The Bear provides many lessons in the way it lives, but courage is the most important teaching it offers. Though gentle by nature, the ferociousness of a mother Bear when one of her cubs is approached is the true definition of courage. To have the mental and moral strength to overcome fears that prevent us from living our true spirit as human beings is a great challenge that must be met with the same vigor and intensity as a mother Bear protecting her cub. Living of the heart and living of the spirit is difficult, but the Bear’s example shows us how to face any danger to achieve these goals.

Honesty ~ Sasquatch

North American Aboriginal culture follows closely an animal called Sasquatch. Sasquatch walks among the people to remind them to be honest to the laws of the creator and honest to each other. The highest honor that could be bestowed upon an individual was the saying “There walks an honest man. He can be trusted.” To be truly honest was to keep the promises one made to the Creator, to others and to oneself. The Elders would say, “Never try to be someone else; live true to your spirit, be honest to yourself and accept who you are the way the Creator made you.”

Humility ~ Wolf
Recognizing and acknowledging that there is a higher power than man and it is known as the Creator is to be deemed truly humble. To express deference or submission to the Creator through the acceptance that all beings are equal is to capture the spirit of humility. The expression of this humility is manifested through the consideration of others before ourselves. In this way, the Wolf became the teacher of this lesson. He bows his head in the presence of others out of deference, and once hunted, will not take of the food until it can be shared with the pack. His lack of arrogance and respect for his community is a hard lesson, but integral in the Aboriginal way.

Truth ~ Turtle
To know truth is to know and understand all of the original laws as given by the Creator- and to remain faithful to them. It is said that in the beginning, when the Creator made man and gave him the seven sacred laws, the Grandmother Turtle was present to ensure that the laws would never be lost or forgotten. On the back of a Turtle are the 13 moon, each representing the truth of one cycle of the Earth’s rotations around the sun. The 28 markings on her back represent the cycle of the moon an of a woman’s body. The shell of the Turtle represents the body real events as created by the Higher Power, and serves as a reminder of the Creator’s will and teachings.

 

Seeing The Sacred In Your Day

Reblogged from: http://www.reflectingalife.com/2012/05/15/seeing-the-sacred-in-your-day/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=seeing-the-sacred-in-your-day

This is sort of a post about God, but only sort of…and for those who have a challenge with even the word you can substitute, the Universe, Higher Self, Higher Power, Spirit or whatever word resonates with you.  As my dear old grandma used to say…a rose by any other name would smell as sweet…or words to that effect.

Have you ever heard of St. Ignatius?  He taught the Jesuits The Daily Examen, which is prayerful reflection on the events of the day in order to detect God’s presence.  A little like a meditation.

St. Ignatius Loyola Catholic Church - Pennsylvania

Ignatius thought that the Examen was a gift that came directly from God, and that God wanted it to be shared as widely as possible. One of the few rules of prayer that Ignatius made for the Jesuit order was the requirement that  the Examen was practiced twice daily—at noon and at the end of the day. Ending with asking for forgiveness for anything rotten you did, and for guidance for tomorrow.

I liked the concept of  reflecting on my day and here is my own personal version, called revision.

1. I connect with my Divine nature by recognizing the Great Presence within and that there is nothing that this higher self that I am (that you are) cannot accomplish. 

2. Review the day; don’t judge it, simply review it. Look over the entire day, all the episodes, all the events, all the conversations, all the meetings, see it clearly in your mind’s eye, and rewrite it. Make it conform to the ideal day you wish you’d experienced. Take scene after scene and rewrite it, revise it, and having revised your day, then, in imagination, re-live that day, the revised day, and do it over and over in your imagination until this seeming imagined state begins to take on the feeling of reality. It seems that it’s real, that you actually did experience it and I have found from experience that these revised days, if really lived, will change our tomorrows.

3.  My prayer means getting into action mentally and holding the attention upon the idea of the wish fulfilled until it fills the mind and crowds all other ideas out of the consciousness. This doesn’t mean that prayer is a mental effort – an act of will. On the contrary, prayer is a surrender. It means abandoning oneself to the feeling of the wish fulfilled. Our thoughts are prayers…we are always praying.

Meditation

4.  Forgiveness is identifying with the ideal we would wish to experience. And so we do to others what we expect or would like the world to do to us.  Whatever I myself would like to embody, that is the vision that I must hold of every man that I meet in my world;  no man is to be discarded, everything can be salvaged, everyone redeemed and I do it by simply identifying the other with the ideal I want to externalize.

Forgive your day, remove the hold that past wrong emotional reactions have upon you by reviewing the experiences and changing them.  Rewrite them in your mind, saying what you wish you’d said and doing what you wished you’d done.

5. Look toward tomorrow from the revised place you’ve just created.

6. Repeat every night.

Maybe if you view it as editing…which I’ve posted about before…it’ll make it easier.  I know revision isn’t the most normal concept in the world.  But hey, who claims to be normal?  An added bonus is that it actually makes a difference.

Encourage one another.

Love Elle.