Sensual Bliss Voyager ~ The Definition

Sen·su·al

ADJECTIVE

1.  carnal: relating to physical or, especially, sexual pleasure

2.  voluptuous: suggesting a great deal of physical or, especially, sexual pleasure

“sensual lips”

3.  sensory: relating to the body or the senses as opposed to the mind or the intellect

[ 15th century. < late Latin sensualis “equipped with feeling or sensation” < Latin sensus(see sense) ]

sen·su·al·ly ADVERB

sen·su·al·ness NOUN

Word Usage

sensual or sensuous Both words are connected with gratification of the human senses. Sensual is the older word, and in the 17th century it developed special meanings associated with the bodily appetites, especially eating and above all sexual satisfaction: Her mouth looked sensual and inviting. They enjoyed the sensual pleasures of the table. About this time the poet John Milton seems to have invented the word sensuous to refer more specifically to the aesthetic and spiritual senses (seeing, hearing, thinking), and it was taken up by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in the 19th century. In current use, it is almost impossible to keep the two sets of meanings apart, since the senses cannot readily be compartmentalized in this way, but it is prudent to have regard for the main distinction when using these words. Sensuous, for example, is the word to use in connection with music or poetry: The conductor relished the sensuous parts of Ravel’s score.

Bliss

NOUN

1. complete happiness: perfect happiness

“It was bliss to have a day at home.”

2. spiritual joy: a state of spiritual joy

[  Old English, alteration of blīþs < Germanic, “gentle, kind” ]

Cultural Note

Bliss, a novel (1981) by Australian writer Peter Carey. A fable about the battle between good and evil, it tells the story of advertising executive Harry Joy who, after a successful heart bypass operation, becomes convinced that he has woken up in Hell. It was made into a movie by Ray Lawrence in 1985.

Voy·a·ger

NOUN

 traveler: somebody who makes a long journey to or through a place